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last blog I talked about how an amazing non-profit, called the Wonderfund, used contemporary business tools to completely reinvent itself. As a result, there were 3 key takeaways that I believe all non-profit organizations could benefit from knowing. 

3 Things All Non-Profits Can Learn from the Wonderfund’s Transformation

by Allison Duchesneau
by Jeff Scott

DCF). Servicing over 50,000 children at any point during the year (a number which is sadly growing) this organization is responsible for looking after our state’s most vulnerable children.

by Allison Duchesneau

Jeff.Scott@accelare.com.

Business architects have yet to settle on a common definition


Have you heard this one?


Three business architects walk into a bar. They order drinks and begin arguing various approaches of pursuing business architecture in their respective companies. Overhearing their discussion, the bartender asks them, “What is this business architecture stuff?” Three hours later the architects are drunk and the bartender is confused.


Three factors drive the variation in business architecture definitions:


1. The business architect’s experience. Each business architect comes to the discipline with a different background and set of experiences. Enterprise architects look at business architecture as an extension of enterprise architecture with its blueprints and standards. Process management professionals see business architecture as a composite of the organization’s processes. Architects with business backgrounds see it as a problem solving and decision making approach. Perhaps even more importantly, since business architecture is very likely new to their organization (and to the architect herself) they bring a lot of who they are into the practice design. The more introverted, analytical business architects might focus more on modeling or process analysis while the more extroverted and people centric business architect might focus more on solutioning through consulting.


2. Each organization is unique. The organization’s culture, design context, and political climate influence the approach to business architecture more than other roles. At the end of the day, succeeding at business architecture requires a wide collection of people at all levels of the organization coming to consensus on a direction and having the willingness to take action, often toward goals that might be good for the organization at large but not for them individually. Culture and politics are the most challenging aspects of practicing business architecture so it shouldn’t be surprising that business architects adapt their approaches to fit the reality on the ground.


3. The business architect’s perspective grows over time. When you look at successful business architecture practices over time you see significant shifts in the architect’s perspective on of what business architecture is about. Most business architecture initiatives begin by looking for quick wins – often cost savings in IT. They are very analytical and operations focused. As they mature, business architecture teams focus more on decision making, investments, and strategy execution. The most mature business architecture practices focus on strategy realization and organizational transformation. Where the architect is on this journey significantly influences his perspective of what business architecture is.


What would you change/add to this list? Please post your thoughts or send me a note. Jeff.Scott@Accelare.com


The bottom line:_________________________________________________________________


Business architects have yet to settle on an agreed upon common definition of their profession despite efforts from multiple professional organizations. Just how important is this?

by Jeff Scott

Chuck” I was intrigued as to how far away the technology featured in the show is. For those not familiar with the show’s premise, Chuck, played by Zachary Levi, is a Stanford dropout who opens an e-mail from his ex-roommate and all the National Security administration and CIA databases gets downloaded into his head. Fearing security risks, the CIA sends him a handler played by Yvonne Strahovski, to help the government make best use of the download known as the “Intersect.”

by Richard Lynch